About your Search

20121001
20121031
STATION
FBC 11
CNBC 10
MSNBC 10
MSNBCW 10
CNNW 8
CNN 7
CSPAN2 3
CSPAN 2
KQED (PBS) 2
WBAL (NBC) 2
WETA 2
WMPT (PBS) 2
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 100
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 103 (some duplicates have been removed)
saw this last year in new york state, for example, when we got the one-two punch of hurricane irene and then the tropical storm lee. so there was quite an uptick in that sort of business. >> ted, thanks. we may catch up again to see how things have hopefully changed. >>> stick around. after the break, we'll find out how the storm could impact the election. the president is getting set to tour new jersey. stay with us for that. >>> we'll leave you with a look at how the futures are trading. the markets are reopening today on wall street. >>> welcome back to "worldwide exchange." >> here are the headlines today. >> super storm sandy leaves a massive path of devastation in its wake, and residents up and down the u.s. east coast are now starting what could be a long and costly recovery process. >> but it is back to business for the financial markets in the u.s., they're going to reopen after a few days. it may not be so easy as new york's mass transit system is still snarled. >>> plus, the force. disney has agreed to buy lucas films for $4 billion and promises a brand-new "star wars" fi
year with irene. we thought it was going to be such a big event for new york and it was a dud. it wasn't a big dud for vermont, new hampshire, new jersey, because of the flooding. but this is what we have to work through right now. this storm that looks like that, like just literally nothing, still a small category 1 hurricane, but can this morph literally into something that will have 80 to 90 mile per hour winds, put 20 inches of rain down, and cause millions of people to be without power for days and probably some for weeks. can it happen? yes. all the forecasts say that it will happen. but you know what, all the forecasts said that irene would be a worse storm than it was and it's not. everyone i'm talking to believes that this storm will be significantly more impact for new york, new jersey, maybe pennsylvania than irene was. >> it's going to be a tropical storm, right, by the time it gets up, by the time it actually hits the eastern seaboard? >> no, it will be a tropical storm briefly in here. here's the model guidance for you. the models are all right there. we put them into mot
. during irene it was 4.4. we expect to double what we had in irene. that's the problem. that's what kicked in yesterday and that's why the mandatory evacuation order was kicked in. the storm is deep in low pressure, and we expect the wind field to push this water up through long island sound and just to give you an example. you can see what's going on here in terms of how high water is. it's below the sea wall, but it's probably going to be about a good third of the way up this pole. that brings it all the way back into the battery and probably into lower parts of manhattan as well. parts of wall street will probably flood, so we anticipate this water to be much higher. the only difference in it could be the fact that it's going to come up gradually as opposed to quick like with the storm surge. not gradual in like 20 minutes but maybe over an hour or so we see that water coming up and coming up. we see the tunnels here shut down. the brooklyn tunnels now shout done, the holland tunnel is closing at 2:00 this afternoon. that's an order from the governor. when you see things like that occur
the candidates are neck-and-neck. >> hold on tight. irene takes me on a fast pace tour of the retirement community in her golf cart. florida is home to many retirees, and a high proportion of them vote. i asked her if they are aware of their influence. >> well, you know, we have people in here 94, 93, 99. some of them are still pretty sharp, and then you have others who are not near that age that do not know what day of the week it is. >> most residents in the community have healthy finances and can afford to pay their rent and purchase a home here. that makes them more likely to lean republican. that is the case with irene, who has supported the republicans for over 60 years. but now, she fears that mitt romney may cut her social security and medicare benefits or privatize them. >> i have never been torn like this in any election, and that's the god's truth. i could have lied to you and said i will vote for romney, but i do not know if i am, and i am a republican. >> state pensions and health care are among the biggest contributors to u.s. deficits. americans agree that government spend
unprecedented proportions. to put things in perspective. hurricane irene which you can see her on the right caused nearly $16 billion in damage and take a look at sandy in comparison. with sandy expected to linger over the northeast for days one can only imagine if the difference in size will reflect the difference in damage. we'll have the latest on the storm track and its strength in one minute. rick? >> reporter: the winds have picked up even more from last hour. steady now in the 40s and 50s with gusts but feel like over 0 miles per hour. i can't even read the wind gauge or turn into the rain because rain and sand is pelting us it many pretty painful. we are just after low tide. so the surf i'll it's rough is not encroaching on the boardwalk at this point and ocean avenue is still relatively dry. but other roads in the community are under water and many other roads across the state of new jersey are hazardous. the garden state parkway has been closed from exit 63 south to cape may. that's a major highway in new jersey shut down because of flooding in both directions. in fact atlantic ci
, former dnc chair and vermont governor howard dean is facing off against ed conard. irene rosenfeld, the ceo of mondolez international. the markets aren't to be forgotten. at 8:30 eastern time, we will be joined by jim grant. we're going to talk about the best investing strategies for the rest of the year with him. first, let's get you up to speed on this morning's headlines. over to andrew. >>> friday we'll get the government september jobs report. could be a game changer for the election. we'll get a hint of what may be to come. the employment report coming at 8:15 eastern time. poll forecasters say the economy likely added 155,000 private payroll jobs this month. we'll bring you the number and get you instant reaction from joel prakken. in corporate news, richard schultz is pressing forward with a possible $11 billion buyout of the retailer. schultz and at least four private equity firms have reportedly started examining the books of the economy. at the same time, he is said to be negotiating individually with the pe firms on the details of how his roughly 20% stake in the compan
surge if it is as forecast, which will be worse than hurricane irene last year, could create some serious problems in terms of getting in to the subway system, in terms of getting into the con ed steam lines and potentially the electrical system. and so even if the wind doesn't blow out power, there could be pry empty differen preemptive power outages. so that's one of the many reasons that they decided to hunger down with all the financial markets. stay home, there's money to be made later and we'll just deal with it. for now just a little bit of a breeze blowing here. that is clearly supposed to chan change. >> where do you go later? >> you have to find a pole, right? you know that that's -- every guy out in a strong breeze, you've seen -- you've got to find a pole around there, right? >> i'll look for it. there's light poles and stuff, but i think i need to get a little further away from the water. >> yeah, that would be a good idea, too. >> we'll have to get him a bungee cord. okay. let's get a little bit more on the forecast on the storm in maria larosa. >> as you mentioned,
and buildings. >> it's vr important. this is the stop the water from gog into the subway. >> irene last year didn't look like this after it hit. >> they expect the storm will pound a wide area for several days. >> sandy has interacted with cold air from the north and it's become a post tropical cyclone. it's not a tropical cyclone anymore but the field of heavy rain and strong winds are expanding and things will get even worse bause the center of a former hurricane sandy is expected to move into the new jersey coast. extremely dangerous storm surge combined with high tide could cause flooding. that's why hundreds of thousands of people have been ordered to evacuate. it's going to move through pennsylvania into new york city. rain will spread as much as 2000 millimeters with 300 millimeters possibly into wednesday. temperatures are on the chilly side. look at this only 8 degrees in washington, d.c. 10 degrees in philadelphia. lots of heavy know is occurring along the appalachians. we'll will joined later on in the program for more of our updates. president obama and republican challenger mitt
jersey area. many of the area has memories of irene on their minds. irene caused billions of dollars of damage. already people here are getting ready for what some are calling the perfect storm. one saw homeowner sandbagging his home yesterday. this is the calm before the storm which is why experts say it is time to get yourself a disaster preparation kit. make sure you have bottled water, batteries and plenty of food on hand in case the storm does the damage it is expected to do. we are live in belmar, new jersey robert moses, fox news. >>> robert, thank you so much. >>> the fiscal cliff is still too much off but the tax hikes and spending cuts already hampering our economy. diane mess is heis here. >> the fiscal cliff may not have hit left but it is already hampering growth in the u.s. economy wiping out nearly 1 million jobs so far this year. the report goes on to forecast if congress fails to avert the cliff 6 million jobs will be lost before 2014 sending the unemployment rate up to 12 percent. part of the problem is the anticipation of the cliff. we are looking at 100 billion au
nervous. >> you think it's going to be bad? >> i think so. >> i'm worried. we lucked out with irene, and i don't know. this may be worse. >> nbc's tom strong traung is l rehoboth beach, delaware. any residents left? >> they have about eight hours, the governor issues a mandatory evacuation area. everybody must be out by 8:00. look down the beach, have you several dozen people trying to get their last glimpse. right now, low tide. looks pretty impressive. come high tide, around 6:30, it wouldn't be a surprise if we didn't see water coming up to this fence here. all around rehoboth beach, a lot of businesses boarded up. people making runs to the grocery store, water short, bread is short. people did what they could in terms of preparation. they had about eight hours, around that time, this area will be shut down. cut off the bridges and roads into here it won't be a very pleasant place to stay if the electricity is going to go out. which is a likelihood. 2,000 utility workers and we're talking about the maryland/dc area, baltimore areas, and states of emergencies in those areas as well. a lo
back there is a storm fence put up. as i understand it, when hurricane irene hit, it came about that far, maybe a little further out. and with a lot of people at first were hesitant to evacuate because they said irene wasn't that bad. most of the damage of flooding was inland and not here on the coast. as you can see, the coast is just washed away. it's completely gone. as i said, it extends perhaps about 100 yards outs in na direction. the same situation from the north and cape may in the south, down near at alantic city towards the tip of new jersey and the garden state parkway the main highway into that area, which bisects of entire state, has been closed off because they don't want people to go back into that area. it's completely vevacuated, and right now somewhere from here to there is where the storm is expected to hit. we're going to take cover when we have to. we're in a position that's somewhat prekd prekted. it's enough protected we feel safe enough. again, things are deteriorating very quickly by the hour. >> all right. >> reporter: back to you guys. >> thank you, ro
moncada nos tiene el informe.. blanca ---ahora al pronostico del tiempo.. cesar ---ahora con irene sanz adelante .. take pkg blanca ---nueva pausa, pero en breve... take vo ---un hombre se mete a una tienda con todo y camioneta.. take sot segment ends cesar ---vamos con ramon diaz quien nos trae toda la accion del mundo de los deportes blanca ---adelante ramon. take pkg cesar ---ultima pausa pero a continuacion... take vo ---un grupo de personas se visten de pandas para ayudar a los animales.. segment ends blanca ---veamos las imagenes del dia.. =====================video 1====================== ---impresionante como una camioneta atraviesa la pared de una licoreria en el area de sacramento. --video de seguridad capto las imagenes del impacto directo donde estaba la caja registradora prensando al encargado quien atendia a un cliente...detras del mostrador. --el conductor se echa de reversa y huye pero mas tarde fue arrestado bajo cargos de manejar intoxicado. --el encargado de la tienda fue llevado al hospital y se espera una pronta recuperacion. =====================video 2============
's reliability problems have existed for years. the last two years with snowmageddon and&hurricane irene and the surprise derecchio storm, reconnection efforts were particularly slow pepco promised to spend more but given the utility's record, the state's public service commission in july allowed only a limited rate hike for the electric company a 130-page report from the governor's task force concluded that utility effort's are still falling short. >> an electric grid that served well and the storm events in the 1980s is not a grid reliable in the more violent and frequent storms that we have now. >> reporter: o'malley estimates that $1 to $2 a month per household will not only speed up the tree trimming -- >> maybe selective undergrounding and other engineering fixes that are different for every portion of the service area. >> reporter: to get the extra dollar or two a month, the utility would have to accelerate reliability strategies. what do ratepayers think? we found a mixed reaction in mont groomery county which, is hard hit the last few years. >> and we pay a lot of mean every mon
the water from going into the subway so we won't have a flood. >> irene last year didn't even look like this after it hit. >> forecasters say they expect the storm will pound a wide area for several days. and with just nine days to go before the u.s. presidential election, the hurricane is altering the schedule and strategies of the two main candidates. president barack obama was set to campaign in three key states on monday, but he cut his trip short and returned to washington to monitor the storm. in 2005 obama's predecessor george w. bush was harshly criticized for his slow response to hurricane katrina. the storm devastated the south of the united states including the city of new orleans. republican campaign evented eeds in the s of virginia on sunday. both campaigns are concerned about the negative impact of early voting. ballots cast ahead of the election account for 30% of the total. we now go to sayaka mori who's been following this storm for us. >> yes, catherine. sandy is quite a massive storm. clouds are blanketing eastern portions of the u.s. into eastern canada. we have lo
than irene's 15.8 billion, last year. but far below katrina's 108-billion dollars and 18-hundred deaths and missing in 2005. unless there is damage to infrastructure, economists say ports and rail yards will make up for lost business quickly. some stock trades, perhaps not--because a light week was expected pending the outcome of the presidential race, a week from now. among insurers, allstate, travelers and chubb corp have the largest market share in sandy's path. corelogic, estimates it includes 284,000 homes worth $88-billion dollars. economists are mixed on whether the storm's impact will affect fourth- quarter g-d-p. mark vitner, senior economist with wells fargo securities says it depends how much is shut down and for how long. mark zandi at moody's analytics says the storm may cause spikes in economic activity--repairing and rebuilding. depsite the storm-- the government is expected to report unemployment numbers for october this friday. phone companies along the east coast are preparing for the likelihood of overtaxed communication infrastructure during hurricane sandy. at&t is
to this storm after hurricane erin green. -- hurricane irene. this is an island. it is very vulnerable to flooding. that has been known for some time. need some sort of coastal defenses. >> thank you very much. for the last 24 hours, images have been coming in of the sheer strength left by sandy. here are a few photographs that capture these images. ♪ ♪ >> the extraordinary images of new york city, a city that all of us know so well, but it looks very different today. that brings the program to a close. i'm kathy kaye. thank you for watching. i will see you tomorrow. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers use their expertise in global finance to guide you through the business strategies and opportunities of international commerce. we put our extended global network to work for a wide range of companies, from small businesses to major corporations. what can we do for
, for hurricane irene, we expected the worst. we had no idea what to expect. the damage is something -- it is definitely something [indiscernible] >> i guess there are an awful lot of people who will need help and it will be sometime before n.y. get back to normal again. >> getting all of the areas that were damaged help and for people out of power, it is going to be a big operation. >> thank you very much indeed for talking to us. i hope your community center gets pumped out very quickly. that me give you a bit more on this levee we heard about in northern new jersey. it is flooding towns with four to 5 feet of water in the wake of hurricane sandy according to officials at. we are in rescue mode according to the chief executive. what we have been hearing from local people is what has happened is there was a trailer park there which has been inundated and people have been climbing onto their roofs of their trailers for safety and waiting to be rescued been that there is obviously now a major rescue operation unfolding now in that county in northern new jersey. obviously we will keep
. >> the fear is it's going to be worse than irene. >> tonight full reports from up and down the east coast. >> it's only a matter of time as this system gets closer. >> governor martin o'malley over the battering in baltimore. and ted strickland on what the storm means for the political storm in ohio. >>> good to have you with us tonight, folks. sandy is expected to make landfall at this hour on the coast of new jersey. the storm is now a post tropical cyclo cyclone. the path on the northeast corridor has been slow and moving very wide. hundreds of thousands of people in coastal areas have been evacuated up and down the east coast. this is a live shot from delaware. we'll get a live update from the shoreline in just a moment. authorities say new york city and long island could get the worst of the storm surge. sea water could rise up to 11 feet. the damage from sandy was on display hundreds of feet above manhattan today. you're seeing a youtube video of a crane collapsing on the 57th street high-rise. city officials say workers would not be able to access the crane to keep it from falling.
island instead of bussing people off the island as they did last year during irene. and that's why we have a situation. let's walk over here and show you what the rest o of atlantic city is dealing with. this is an access ramp that takes you up to the boardwalk. so these are the streets of atlantic city down here. this is what it looks like. several feet of water covering the street. and here's where things became a problem. you have 400 people on the other side of the city who decided to ride out the storm and stay in their homes and as we talked earlier today, flood water was coming into those homes and there was no way for local emergency crews to get to them. so they had to mobilize national guard units to get those people out of their homes. things got so dangerous they had to pull the personnel back. so there were a couple hundred people still in their homes on the bay side of the city. the governor said it's a situation they will have to monitor and first thing in the morning at first light respond to and try to get those people out. not far from here just a couple blocks, one
. gerri: where would it ranked? if it was a billion. >> i can tell you that hurricane irene last year was $43 billion in damage, and that was the top ten costliest hurricane. gerri: we are not done with hurricane season. >> we have a lot of time left to go. hurricanes are august, but basically it runs until the end of november. so we could even have another storm after this. gerri: what is the one thing you tell people to do this weekend? >> everybody should basically do a home inventory. you have time, your home, a detailed list of your stuff. we have a free application and suffer to make it easy. this way if you have to file a claim you know what you have. it will also help you to buy the right amount of insurance "and a lot of good tips for making sure you have the right amount of coverage. gerri: bring in your pink flamingos people. you cannot have them outside. they become missiles. >> that is another good thing. take in everything from outside. gerri: all right. thank you for coming on. appreciate your time and tips. coming at, apple's stock dropped $100 in the past month. is th
storms in 1878 and 1903 and then hurricane irene became a tropical storm when it hit just last year. now, hurricane irene caused roughly $15 billion in damage all across the northeast. the state of new jersey alone got $275 million in federal assistance most going to homeowners and flooding private insurers. here in cape may, commercial fishing is the big business. a billion dollars in revenue for new jersey. further up atlantic city of course we know all of those casinos, 12 flagship institutions across the boardwalk are closed and halloween parties canceled. atlantic city is lower lying. that will be a very, very big hit. the place to watch. evacuated yesterday by 4:00 p.m. and chris christie declaring a state of emergency there because of how bad conditions are supposed to get there. it's only 9:00 a.m. right now. you can see how bad it's getting. the waves are spilling up into the dunes and there is flooding in the street. there's structural damage just a couple blocks away that we'll check out. definitely a strengthening storm here on the shore of new jersey. carl? >> kayla, thank y
for this outdoor reporting. >> been bringing us great updates. >> she dade great job too last year with irene. i think she was in north carolina. >> anyway, we'll check back in with kayla later this morning. let's also take a look at the markets. the futures are indicated higher after all the concerns that have been out there. the s&p futures up by more than 9.5 points. the dow futures are up by 65 points. not a lot of news stories that have been coming through. you've heard some earnings here and there. yesterday we had ford out early with better than expected numbers early. and there are a few other stories that have been out there, too. you guys see the ubs story? >> 10,000 jobs. >> 10,000 jobs this they were laying off. a lot of people found out when they showed up for work in london and their cards didn't work. other people found out because their e-mail kept bouncing back. that's the worst situation i've ever heard. it's not going to get nearly enough attention because of all the other things that are happening out there. >> did you see the other big merger yesterday? disney and "star wars
with these types of storms. we had your cain irene last year with over a million customers without power. rachel came through this summer knocked out the same amount without power. we've been through this before. our local officials have been through this before. they're well-trained. they have good plans how to respond to this. we've been communicating and people are taking steps to be prepared. so we feel fairly confident in virginia folks are taking the steps to be ready for whatever the storm might bring. jon: i know you have got the national guard out and ready did. you've got power crews coming in from other states to help restore power as well, don't you?. >> yeah. we know many of our power companies in virginia are prepositioning out-of-state resources coming in. national guard we deployed them in key areas around the commonwealth to be ready to deploy and help out local officials that might need assistance. we have our state police and out there. department of transportation. they have their crews across the commonwealth. they're already to go to help out as needed. jon: from virginia's
irene making it the fourth costly experienced? >> this is will be worse. three storms. we've never seen anything like this. it's definitely going to be devastating. >> gregg: i was reading forbes, i wish we could put it on o up the scream. beside for potential life and safety, economists are predicting that it will upwards of $55 billion in economic damage? >> yeah, it's hard to tell. we don't really know how it'sng. estimates are all over the place. there is one positive. sectors that desperately need more work, construction workers, electricians, plumbers all the rest, they will be finding more work. so there is some stimulus there, but again it's mainly to the negative. >> gregg: if you are contractor out there, this maybe the silver lining. the other thing, we have seen in past disasters that it dramatically affects unemployment and g.d.p. because those are tied together? >> absolutely. people won't be going to work. as you said, retailers won't be selling, there won't be tax revenues. and g.d.p. measures how much we produce. if we are not producing that much, with that many people
irene hit this area a lot of people evacuated. the coast wasn't hit that hard. the bigger problem was inland. that's why [ inaudible ] behind this time but for the most -- staying behind last time but for now people are pushing out because of the danger, the high winds are obvious. we're in a very protected position, by the way, and we're going to move back if things get worse. but again, we're charting it by the hour every hour and for now, things here are under control, but again it's getting to be a very dangerous situation down here. andrea? >> i was going to ask you that exact question, ron. so you and your crew, you know what to do. but the people who are -- and this is repeating the president's appeal, what chris christie has said, mike bloomberg, the appeal to people who are refusing to evacuate because they are putting first responders in danger and as i'm looking at the pictures of you, ron, the shape of that beach along the jersey shore is never going to be the same. this is going to have to be restored in some way because the enormous erosion already is being washed aw
. that is a worrying sign for jetblue. hurricane irene affected them. florida was one of their main ports and they got affected by hurricane irene. that will bring down their of the pros. just a year ago there was lockout and they didn't pass the faa taxes for the airlines. airlines pocketed that. this year the tax is in place. airlines aren't going to see that. david: okay. >> so we'll see jetblue miss. we have two bold estimates on the negative side. these are the best rated analysts that are below the estimate. david: we have to do this quickly because we're running out of time. final loser, the final one that will disappoint on expectations natural resources company called cliffs. they actually had a 6% bump their stock, so you're going against the trend? >> we are. in fact they also have analysts that are far below the consensus. the smart estimate is 10 cents below the consensus estimate. that says the best analysts and latest --. david: so people aren't confused out there. you see green arrows and plus signs. sri is saying no, this will disappoint. even though up today a big disappointment in e
. the mayor here wants to make sure people don't get complacent, basis year ago, hurricane irene, they had all these dire warnings, and it really didn't do much to this city. he wants to make sure they understand that this time there really could be some severe flooding, a storm surge of 4-eight of 8 feet which would mean where i'm standing will certainly be underwater. he's warning people in the low-lying parts of the island to prepare to evacuate. he said power could be out for days. they need a disaster supply kit. it's very important that people don't get complacent based on what happened a year ago because this one could be much worse. bob. >> schieffer: all right, thank you, my friend. chip reid in maryland. let's go now to cbs news correspondent elaine quijano. she is at point pleasant beach, new jersey this morning. elaine, what's the latest there? >> reporter: good morning to you, bob. well, governor chris christie has declared a statement of emergency here in new jersey, and he's also ordered the mandatory evacuation for residents who live on the barrier islands. that begin at 4:00 t
summer's hurricane irene cost more than $15.8 billion in damages after hitting an area from north carolina to maine. in 1972 hurricane agnes did more than $11.7 billion of damage. it went from florida to long island, new york. let's check in with bill karins. he is a upstairs. where is it now and where is it headed in the next few hours? >>> it's amazing it's safely off the shore. it's not causing too much damage or chaos yet. we'll watch landfall this evening probably around 8 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. that's when the destruction will be done during the high tide cycle and the winds. this morning is not horrible. here's the new forecast in the hurricane center. it increases in intensity. it could go up to 90 miles per hour. a healthy category one just off the "jersey shore." it will make the hook. the unusual historic cal hook to the left into the jersey shore. the winds will be in the center including from the central jersey shore. possibility of 80 mile per hour winds. we may be out there on the tip of long island, somewhere on the south shore be able to get a gust to 90. that's very,
to at the top-- top, it's the widest hurricane we've seen. hurricane irene came last august. she came knocking on the door and no one was listening. hurricane sandy is in the house and neither presidential candidate can walk away from what is happening. we've got to begin to plan for what's ahead. the reaction is that it's over. milk is spilt. the climate is changing rapidly. we've got a super storm that is right in front of us. we've got the hurricane coming in off the atlantic. it's met up with a nor'easter, and then to flow this thing into epic proportion, we're missing 1.35 million square miles of ice in the arctic. so all the heat in the arctic ocean is thrown up into the atmosphere and the jet stream, as it loops south as far south as well into this hurricane and we've got ourselves a super storm. hello. it's time to get into it. >> cenk: dr. halter, let me read you a quote from rutgers situation. she writes, the situation is consistent with what i would expect to see more often as a result of unabated warming especially the amplification of the warming in the arctic. you just mentioned
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 103 (some duplicates have been removed)